AtkinsonPresElect

Remember Common Core? It’s still in North Carolina.

Despite what you hear in the media or from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (DPI), Common Core is still alive and well in the state.  What DPI has done over the past five years in order to kill the firestorm surrounding the standards is rebrand them under the name ,The North Carolina Essential Standards’.

DPI has also spent time re-wording the high school math standards and spearheaded efforts to lock access to giving students the choice of a traditional math sequence versus the Common Core’s ‘integrated math’.

North Carolina’s Superintendent, June Atkinson, has consistently championed this failed and flawed set of standards from the very beginning — even before it was called Common Core.  She still does.  Her loyalty to the standards defies logic given the flat and stagnant test scores that have been recorded for students in the state since the implementation of the standards.

AtkinsonPresElectFor what it’s worth, Atkinson was elected in 2014 as President of the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO). The CCSSO is one of the two unelected and unaccountable non-governmental organizations that were instrumental in the creation the Common Core. Local media outlets in North Carolina buried this little detail despite the ongoing review of Common Core in the state.

In February of 2009, Former Education Secretary Arne Duncan came to North Carolina to speak at an NGA symposium hosted in part by the Jim Hunt Institute. In Duncan’s remarks, he pushed the Race To The Top grant as an enticement for states provided they followed “four assurances”:

1. Adopt internationally benchmarked standards and assessments that
prepare students for success in college and the workplace
2. Recruit, develop, retain, and reward effective teachers and principals
3. Turn around low-performing schools
4. Build data systems that measure student success and inform teachers
and principals how they can improve their practices.

While not specifically mentioned by name, Common Core was the only set of standards being pushed as “internationally benchmarked” and would make kids “career and college ready”.

There are problems with this speech by Duncan. The Race To The Top grant would not be announced until July of 2009, for one thing. For another, the Common Core standards were not released until June of 2009.

When the legislature asked Supt. Atkinson about the role the Race To The Top money played in North Carolina’s adoption of the Common Core standards. Specifically, she was asked, “Was the motivation of the State Board making changes the whole Race To The Top grant?”.

This is what Atkinson had this to say:

“When the State Board of Education started on this journey.. we.. they didn’t even know there was a word.. or words “Race to the Top”.  The State Board of Education made these decisions before the U.S office of Education released the request for proposal for the Race To The Top.  It was timely for North Carolina, however, because of our economic situation.”

Given what we know about Duncan’s visit in 2009, it’s plain that Dr. Atkinson lied to the General Assembly.

Another problem is that North Carolina’s Race To The Top application was submitted in January of 2010 and in the state’s application for the grant, Common Core was cited by name. This is problematic since the North Carolina State Board of Education did not adopt the standards until June of 2010.

Atkinson is up for re-election this year and she has some competition. Her challenger is Mark Johnson.

While Johnson has not firmly committed to a position on Common Core, he recently said that, “Every year that goes by is another year our students and teachers are dealing with age-inappropriate standards. Where is the urgency at the top of our state education department to tackle these tough issues? Instead, our education leaders are okay with the status quo. More of the same cannot be the only option for our students and educators.”

For the record, the Hunt Institute has been the recipient of millions from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for the express purpose of promulgating Common Core propaganda.

By millions, I mean $13, 508, 203 million dollars in total. The largest of the grants they received were for “College Ready” reasons — i.e. Common Core.

GRANTEE YEAR ISSUE PROGRAM AMOUNT
James B. Hunt, Jr. Institute for Educational Leadership and Policy Foundation, Inc. 2015 Postsecondary Success US Program $229,187.00
James B. Hunt, Jr. Institute for Educational Leadership and Policy Foundation, Inc. 2015 College-Ready US Program $900,000.00
James B. Hunt, Jr. Institute for Educational Leadership and Policy Foundation, Inc. 2014 Global Policy & Advocacy US Program $1,000,202.00
James B. Hunt, Jr. Institute for Educational Leadership and Policy Foundation, Inc. 2013 College-Ready US Program $1,749,070.00
James B. Hunt, Jr. Institute for Educational Leadership and Policy Foundation, Inc. 2013 College-Ready US Program $500,000.00
James B. Hunt, Jr. Institute for Educational Leadership and Policy Foundation, Inc. 2013 College-Ready US Program $100,000.00
James B. Hunt, Jr. Institute for Educational Leadership and Policy Foundation, Inc. 2012 Global Policy & Advocacy US Program $45,422.00
James B. Hunt, Jr. Institute for Educational Leadership and Policy Foundation, Inc. 2011 College-Ready US Program $500,906.00
James B. Hunt, Jr. Institute for Educational Leadership and Policy Foundation, Inc. 2010 Postsecondary Success US Program $292,594.00
James B. Hunt, Jr. Institute for Educational Leadership and Policy Foundation, Inc. 2009 and earlier Global Policy & Advocacy US Program $5,549,352.00
James B. Hunt, Jr. Institute for Educational Leadership and Policy Foundation, Inc. 2009 and earlier Global Policy & Advocacy US Program $2,213,470.00
James B. Hunt, Jr. Institute for Educational Leadership and Policy Foundation, Inc. 2009 and earlier Global Policy & Advocacy US Program $500,000.00
$13,580,203

 


Related:

Timeline of Common Core in NC (updated October 2016)

6 Years Later, Common Core is still Age and Developmentally Inappropriate

After five years of Common Core, ACT scores show no sign of ‘College Readiness’

View the History of Common Core in North Carolina

This article was posted in Blog, News by LadyLiberty1885 - A.P. DIllon on October 16, 2016 at 11:36 am.

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